Motives for recreational hunting and alleged moral significance

Christian Gamborg

University of Copenhagen

Christian Gamborg, Ph.D. Associate Professor in Natural Resource Ethics, Dept. Food and Resource Economics, University of Copenhagen. The main part of his research relates to ethical aspects in relation to the human use of the natural environment. He has been part of governmental agency advisory groups on wild boar and wolf management in relation to social and ethical aspects. Besides scientific communication on these issues, he has recently (2016) co-authored a book: ”Hunting: Nature, Humans, Animals and Killing” (in Danish), trying to understand hunting in a contemporary, urbanized society from different value perspectives. 

Frank Jensen

University of Copenhagen

Ph. D. Frank Søndergaard Jensen (FSJ) is Professor with special responsibilities within Outdoor Recreation at the Dept. of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management at the University of Copenhagen, where he is head of the research group on Nature, Green Spaces and Outdoor Recreation (http://ign.ku.dk/english/research/landscape-architecture-planning/nature-green-spaces-and-outdoor-recreation/). FSJ’s research has focused on monitoring the use of nature areas for recreation and assessment of the general population’s preferences for different environments for recreational purposes. This experience has e.g. been utilised as expert member of Danish government commissions on access legislation and development of the first Danish national outdoor recreation policy. International research has been conducted in e.g. a number of Scandinavian and EU-funded projects, primarily focusing on outdoor recreation and forestry. Lately, research interest also includes values, attitudes and behaviour in relation to wildlife management and the impact of recreational activities on the GDP. For more information please see: http://ign.ku.dk/english/employees/landscape-architecture-planning/?pure=en/persons/269934

Abstract

For recreational hunters in the Western world today hunting is rarely, if ever, necessary for obtaining food or other necessities. Thus, the hunter’s primary motive for hunting is related to some form of personal... [ view full abstract ]

Authors

  1. Christian Gamborg (University of Copenhagen)
  2. Frank Jensen (University of Copenhagen)
  3. Peter Sandøe (University of Copenhagen)

Topic Area

Topics: Hunting and Fishing

Session

M-3A » Understanding the Connections Between Humans and Wildlife III (15:30 - Monday, 18th September, Assembly Hall A)

Presentation Files

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