Benefits of risk mapping for mitigating human-carnivore conflicts

Zoe Hanley

Washington State University

Zoë Hanley has worked on meso-carnivore and large carnivore conservation projects for federal, state, and non-profit organizations for the past decade. She recently received her PhD degree in Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences from Washington State University conducting research on wolf-livestock interactions in Washington, USA. Zoë currently lives in Walla Walla, WA and is continuing to pursue international postdoctoral opportunities in large carnivore conservation.

Abstract

Over the past few decades, human-carnivore conflicts have received increasing attention worldwide as most large carnivore populations continue to decline. Many carnivores have large territories and specialize in ungulate... [ view full abstract ]

Authors

  1. Zoe Hanley (Washington State University)
  2. Robert Wielgus (Washington State University)
  3. Hilary Cooley (U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service)
  4. Benjamin Maletzke (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife)

Topic Areas

Topics: Human-Wildlife Conflict , Topics: Collaborative Conservation

Session

T-1B » HWC: Wolf (08:00 - Tuesday, 19th September, Assembly Hall B)

Presentation Files

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